Vehicles in Charney

First motorised vehicle in Charney George Bungay [Ruth Gerring]. Identified as probably a Triumph by the National Motorcycle Museum.
First motorised vehicle in Charney George Bungay [Ruth Gerring]. Identified as probably a Triumph by the National Motorcycle Museum.

First motorised vehicle in Charney, George Bungay [Ruth Gerring]. Identified as probably a Triumph Motorcycle by the National Motorcycle Museum.

Robert 'Bobby' Woolford - Carriers [Shirley Dore]
Robert ‘Bobby’ Woolford – Carriers [Shirley Dore]
The vehicle outside ‘Bobby’ Woolford’s is a 1928 Season (August 1927 – August 1928) Morris 10 cwt Light Van. Features including the oval windows in the side panels, the driver’s door capping indicating winding windows and the side panels being stepped in above the rear wings are characteristic of the Light Van of this Season. Later models of the vans were fitted with an improved radiator design to assist with cooling (the radiator of the van in the image is the “snubnose” type taken from the Morris Cowley design and was found to be wanting for the commercial van application. The “RX” registration, which ran from May 1927 to March 1932, is also consistent with the vehicle being manufactured in the 1927 – 1928 timeframe. So we can say with confidence that the photo was taken sometime after August 1927.
Clive Dunn

“I believe that the motor car in the photograph is a Singer Junior; it appears to be a Tourer and the split windscreen probably dates it to around 1928. The Junior was launched in 1926 and became an instant success with many different body styles being introduced as demand grew. The car had an 848 cc OHC engine and developed a respectable 16.5 bhp. Note the box mounted on the running board which enclosed the battery. 
Clive Dunn”
Off for a drive! Maud Ody front passenger
Off for a drive! Maud Ody front passenger
Joe Ody, whose mother is sitting in the passenger seat, believes that this photograph was taken in 1935 or thereabouts. On first glance, the manufacturer of the car is far from obvious. However, on close examination of the wheels, frame and suspension I am of the opinion that a humble Austin 7 lies beneath the homemade adournments and modifications.
– Clive Dunn