1892

Longworth Parish Magazine 1892

January 1892

There has been some talk of asking our daughter Parish, Charney, to combine with us this year in the Magazine. The proposal has not yet been made, but we think it may serve to make the Parish Sheet more interesting to us, as well as to them.

April 1892

The Magazine this month, as will be seen, comes with a new title. Charney seems to have taken kindly to the idea of joining us in it. They start with an order for 49 copies a month. It is probable that, as we shall thus have the news of both villages to insert, we may more often have to go into a second page of local news, in which case our expenses will be somewhat increased. Mr Wright prints one page for us free, and we pay 2s 6d for an extra one, and 1s 3d for half.

St Peter’s, Charney

(From our Charney Correspondent)

There will be a Service in S. Peter’s every Thursday evening during Lent at 6-30, with a Sermon by the Rector.

The Boys in Charney School were examined in Drawing by Mr Selwyn Edwards, HM Inspector, on Thursday, March the 3rd. The report has not yet been received.

The influenza has been very prevalent in Charney since Christmas, but the epidemic is now, we hope, abating.

We have to thank Mr and Mrs Pusey very much for their kind gifts of £1, a dozen of port wine, and some rabbits for the sick.

(The extracts from the Parish Registers have not reached us. We hope to insert them next month. – Ed.)

May 1892

St Peter’s, Charney

Extract from Parish Registers

Marriage: April 16 – Henry Ballard to Rebecca Midwinter

Burial Feb 13 – Jane Dixey, 19 years.

July 1892

S. Peter’s, Charney

The Anniversary of the Benefit Club took place on Thursday, June 2nd, and headed by their band, the members walked to Church, where the usual Service was held at 10-45. They then proceeded to Lyford, and on their return to Charney sat down to dinner in Mr Pike’s barn at 1-30. The Rev WH Bath took the chair, and was supported by Mr Craddock, Mr Rickards, Mr Pike, and Mr Lyford. We are glad to find the Club is in a fairly prosperous condition, but it would be better if it did not break up each year.

Quite a gloom was cast over the village on Friday, June the 10th, by the death of Wilfred Hubert Whitfield, aged 5 years, who was drowned in the river Ock. He was playing with another little boy of the same age on the bank of the stream near his home and fell into the water. No one was near the children at the time, but news of the accident soon reached the poor mother, who hastened to the spot with Mr Nash and Henry Midwinter. After a few minutes the body was found and taken out of the water, and every effort was made to restore animation, but without avail. The inquest was held on Monday. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Whitfield in their great and unexpected sorrow. Mr Whitfield was at Pusey when the accident took place.

Baptisms: June 5 – Christina May Walter, Annie Barlow

Marriage: April 20 – Thomas Curtis and Mary Moss

Burial: June 13 – Wilfred Hubert Whitfield, aged 5 years.

August 1892

S. Peter’s, Charney

On June 16th, the School in this parish was examined by the Rev CE Adams, the Diocesan Inspector of Schools. Following is his report:-

“The results of the Examination bear witness to the very conscientious work which has been done in the School. The several subjects of the syllabus had all received proper attention, and were well known, the answering in the two Lower Divisions especially being excellent. The children in the Higher Standards were very shy, and scarcely did themselves justice, but their Repetition was good, and the answers which were obtained from them shewed that their subjects had been carefully prepared. The written work was, on the whole, good, though some of the papers and slates shewed a good many careless mistakes. The Tone of the School is very  pleasant.”

Diocesan Prize– Mary A Ballard

Commended– Emily Douglas (had had prize), Tom Woodbridge, Bertie Fuller, Margaret Lawes, Bertie Bames, Louisa Lee, Albert Jackson, Beatrice Cobb, Clu. Whitfield, George Shorter, H Eldridge.

On Wednesday, July 20th, a similar meeting was held to that at Longworth on June 29th. The Boxes were opened, and found to contain 6s 6d. The following objects for the offering were proposed to them: – (1) The Waifs and Strays’ Society. (2) Hymn Books for the Church. (3) Offertory Bags. The box-holders unanimously gave their vote to the Waifs and Strays, and a Postal Order for the amount collected has been sent to them. The amount in each box was as follows:-

No.

s.

d.

 

No.

s.

d.

 

No.

s.

d.

1

0

9

 

6

0

9 ½

 

11

0

3

2

0

1 ½

 

7

0

6

 

12

0

1 ½

3

0

3

 

8

0

6

 

13

0

11 ½

4

0

1 ½

 

9

0

1 ½

 

14

1

5 ½

5

0

2

 

10

0

2 ½

 

15

0

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

6

6

We very much hope that the children and their parents will come forward and take the boxes again next Lent.

September 1892

We regret at the time of going to press no news has reached us from Charney.

October 1892

We shall be very grateful to anyone who will send us Charney news from time to time. It should be addressed to Mrs Illingworth, and reach her before the 18th of the month.

November 1892

S. Peter’s, Charney

The usual Harvest Thanksgiving Services were held in S. Peter’s Church, on Sunday, September the 25th. The Church was tastefully decorated with fruit, flowers, and wheat, by Mr and Mrs Nash, and Mrs Black. The screen and chancel looked very pretty and were much admired. There was a fair congregation in the morning, and a good one in the evening. The collections amounted to £1 10s., which was forwarded to the Wantage Cottage hospital.

A new oak notice board has lately been placed in the south porch of S. Peter’s, and the porch has been cleaned and painted. Both the church doors have also been painted, and the Church gate has been repaired and painted. A new oak cover has been provided for the font.

Baptisms: Aug 7 Elizabeth Jane Dix, Walter John James.

December 1892

S. Peter’s, Charney

Mrs Fletcher very kindly gave a Treat to Charney School, on Saturday Oct the 22nd. The children accompanied by Miss King and Miss Hobbs, were conveyed to Frilford in wagons, kindly lent by Mr Craddock, Mr Master, and Mr Rickards. On their arrival at 2-30pm, they played for a short time in the large field behind the house, and were then taken into the barn, where an excellent meal of cake, bread and butter, bread and jam, tea, coffee, etc, was provided, to which ample justice was done by all. The children were waited on by Miss Fletcher, Rev FP Green, Rev WH Bath, Miss King, Miss Hobbs, and other kind helpers. After tea the children were taken into the house where Mrs Fletcher gave a very nice scarlet or brown serge cloak to every girl, and a scarf and pocket-knife to every boy. After this all returned to the field, where various games were played until  it was dark, when they left for home in the wagons after giving hearty cheers for Mrs and Miss Fletcher, and thanking them for their kindness.